Here is the Q & A from the Free Book Friday interview:

1) When did you first know that you wanted to be a writer?

The idea first surfaced in eighth grade. Not in a conventional way—like winning an essay contest, but when my teacher called roll on the first day of school. “Kimberly Blackadar,” he said, “that is the name of an author.” I was only thirteen, and my best pieces of writing were often folded and passed across the room, but still his words stayed with me, year after year, until I sat down at my computer and started my first book.

2) Your characters seem so alive and real…what’s your secret?

I write teen fiction, so I listen to teenagers—not just the way they talk, but what troubles them the most. I do, however, warn them (with a huge smirk) that what they say can and will be used in future novels.

3) How do you come up with your character names?

Hmm, I was just asked this question during a recent school visit, and with some serious color in my cheeks, I admitted, “I google sexy baby names.” I mean, some names just scream romance fiction, and others, um, don’t. (My name, by the way, is not on any of the lists. Apparently, my parents didn’t consider sex appeal when they named me.)

4) Which fictional character do you have a secret crush on?

Rob Callahan. He’s perfect, and he says exactly what I want him to say. (Imagine that?) Seriously though, romance writers need to fall for their book’s love interest right along with the main character; it makes the story more believable. But girls, remember this: most fictional boys are too good to be true, and well, that’s because they aren’t.

5) Which came first, the title or the novel?

The novel came first, but the title is a line in the book. When I was reading over the first draft, the phrase popped from the page and I knew it would make a great title. Teens, no matter which path they choose in life, are intrigued by “trouble.” Some seek it; others avoid it. Either way, I wanted to hook them with the title.

Check the whole interview at:  http://teens.freebookfriday.com/2010/02/nothing-but-trouble-after-midnight-by.html

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